top of page

INTERVENTIONAL PSYCHIATRY

Learn more about the Translational Psychiatry Research Group's research in interventional psychiatry.

AIM

question.png

Improve treatments for people experiencing mental health problems, ranging from psychosis and post-traumatic stress disorder, to addiction disorders.

CURRENT RESEARCH

Our current research is primarily conducted via systematic reviews, neuroimaging studies, and experimental medicine. Our interest lies primarily in exploring biological systems, for example the endocannabinoid system (ECS), to improve treatments for people experiencing mental disorders.

PREVIOUS RESEARCH

Cannabidiol for the treatment of cannabis use disorder: a phase 2a, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomised, adaptive Bayesian trial. The Lancet Psychiatry. 2020.

To our knowledge, this is the first adaptive Bayesian dose-finding trial of cannabidiol for a new medical indication. This trial identified that, administered at 400mg and 800mg, cannabidiol was both safer and more effective than placebo at reducing cannabis use. Such results are significant given policy redesigns on cannabis product production, distribution, and sale, global increases in individuals seeking treatment for cannabis use disorders (CUD) and the current paucity of clinically recommended pharmacological interventions for CUD.

The effects of acute cannabidiol on cerebral blood flow and its relationship to memory: An arterial spin labelling magnetic resonance imaging study. Journal of Psychopharmacology. 2020.

We used a randomised, crossover, double-blind study to understand the mechanisms underlying the effects of cannabidiol (CBD) on memory processing. We measured regional CBF at rest using arterial spin labelling, and assessed working memory and episodic memory with digit span tasks and a prose recall task respectively. We found CBD increases CBF to brain regions involved in memory processing – findings which have significant implications in identifying mechanisms of CBD for a myriad of conditions associated with altered memory processing.

To learn more, browse through our publications.

bottom of page